Arthur T. Irvine’s service with Battery D, 5th Regiment, U.S. Army Light Artillery

Arthur T Irvine headstone, Duke Center, PA

Arthur T Irvine headstone, Duke Center, PA

There can be no doubt that Arthur Irvine was very affected by his service in the Civil War. He was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic and his service is immortalized on his headstone at the Duke Center Cemetery.

The battery in which Arthur served participated in most of the bloodiest battles of that tragic conflict. He was with 5th Regiment, Battery D when it was first formed and discharged in late September 1862. Details of the reason for his discharge (honorable) are under research, so check back!

Below is a list of movements of Battery D and the battles in which Arthur participated. One can barely imagine the horrors he witnessed, the fear he had to conquer and the friends he lost.

  • Original battle flag of Battery D, 5th U.S. Artillery Regiment

    Original battle flag of Battery D, 5th U.S. Artillery Regiment

    Arthur’s enlistment, Chicago, IL (May 14, 1861)

  • Duty in the Defenses of Washington (until Mar 1862)
  • Rockville Expedition (10 Jun – 7 Jul 1861)
  • Advance on Manassas, VA (16 – 21 Jul 1861)
  • First Bull Run (21 Jul 1861)
  • Lewinsville, VA (11 Sep 1861)
  • Reconnaissance to Lewinsville (25 Sep 1861)
  • Edward’s Ferry (22 Oct 1861)
  • Ordered to the Virginia Peninsula (Mar 1862)
  • Howard’s Mill (4 Apr 1862)
  • Warwick Road (5 Apr 1862)
  • Siege of Yorktown (5 Apr – 4 May 1862)
  • Hanover Court House (27 May 1862)
  • Operations about Hanover Court House (27 – 29 May 1862)
  • Seven days before Richmond (25 Jun – 1 Jul 1862)
  • Mechanicsburg (26 Jun 1862)
  • Gaines Mill (27 Jun 1862)
  • Turkey Bridge (30 Jun 1862)
  • Malvern Hill (1 Jul 1862)
  • At Harrison’s Landing (til Aug 16 1862)
  • Moved to Fortress Monroe, thence to Alexandria (16 – 23 Aug 1862)
  • Maryland Campaign (6 – 22 Sep 1862)
  • Battle of Antietem (16 – 17 Sep 1862)
  • Shepherdstown Ford (19 Sep 1862)

 

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